Browsing Posts tagged interstate movement

Downsize Government

Memo ~~ USDA knows 18% of the beef consumed in the USA was imported
in 2011 because the nation does not produce enough product to feed
it’s people, yet more costly rulemaking is assessed upon producers
by bureaucrats. This document is vague and impossible to determine
the teeth, however, be assured, the devil is in the details. Once
Hammerschmidt gets this approved and mandatory he will personally
add the teath. There will be no more listening sessions or public
comments — the federales will have their way, regardless of the
majoritie’s oppositon.

Yesterday, USDA submitted it Animal Disease Traceability Rule to the
White House Office of Management and Budget for final review. See
Below.
This is one obstinate agency.

 

AGENCY: USDA-APHIS RIN: 0579-AD24TITLE: Animal Disease Traceability
Neil HammerschmidtSTAGE: Final Rule ECONOMICALLY SIGNIFICANT: No
** RECEIVED DATE: 04/25/2012 LEGAL DEADLINE: None
RIN Data
USDA/APHIS RIN: 0579-AD24 Publication ID: Fall 2011
Title: Animal Disease Traceability

Abstract: This rulemaking would establish a new part
in the Code of Federal Regulations containing minimum
national identification and documentation requirements
for livestock moving interstate. The proposed regulations
specify approved forms of official identification for each
species covered under this rulemaking but would allow such
livestock to be moved interstate with another form of
identification, as agreed upon by animal health officials
in the shipping and receiving States or tribes. The purpose
of the new regulations is to improve our ability to
trace livestock in the event that disease is found.

Agency: Department of Agriculture(USDA)
Priority: Other Significant
RIN Status: Previously published in the Unified Agenda Agenda Stage
of Rulemaking: Final Rule Stage
Major: No Unfunded Mandates: No
CFR Citation: 9 CFR 90
Legal Authority: 7 USC 8305
Legal Deadline: None

Statement of Need: Preventing and controlling animal disease is the
cornerstone of protecting American animal agriculture. While ranchers
and farmers work hard to protect their animals and their livelihoods,
there is never a guarantee that their animals will be spared from
disease. To support their efforts, USDA has enacted regulations to
prevent, control, and eradicate disease, and to increase foreign and
domestic confidence in the safety of animals and animal products.
Traceability helps give that reassurance. Traceability does not prevent
disease, but knowing where diseased and at-risk animals are, where they
have been, and when, is indispensable in emergency response and in
ongoing disease programs. The primary objective of these proposed
regulations is to improve our ability to trace livestock in the event
that disease is found in a manner that continues to ensure the smooth
flow of livestock in interstate commerce.

Summary of the Legal Basis: Under the Animal Health Protection Act (7
U.S.C. 8301 et seq.), the Secretary of Agriculture may prohibit or
restrict the interstate movement of any animal to prevent the
introduction or dissemination of any pest or disease of livestock, and
may carry out operations and measures to detect, control, or eradicate
any pest or disease of livestock. The Secretary may promulgate such
regulations as may be necessary to carry out the Act.

Alternatives: As part of its ongoing efforts to safeguard animal
health, APHIS initiated implementation of the National Animal
Identification System (NAIS) in 2004. More recently, the Agency launched
an effort to assess the level of acceptance of NAIS through meetings
with the Secretary, listening sessions in 14 cities, and public
comments. Although there was some support for NAIS, the vast majority of
participants were highly critical of the program and of USDA's
implementation efforts. The feedback revealed that NAIS has become a
barrier to achieving meaningful animal disease traceability in the
United States in partnership with America's producers. The option we are
proposing pertains strictly to interstate movement and gives States and
tribes the flexibility to identify and implement the traceability
approaches that work best for them.

Anticipated Costs and Benefits: A workable and effective animal
traceability system would enhance animal health programs, leading to
more secure market access and other societal gains. Traceability can
reduce the cost of disease outbreaks, minimizing losses to producers and
industries by enabling current and previous locations of potentially
exposed animals to be readily identified. Trade benefits can include
increased competitiveness in global markets generally, and when
outbreaks do occur, the mitigation of export market losses through
regionalization. Markets benefit through more efficient and timely
epidemiological investigation of animal health issues. Other societal
benefits include improved animal welfare during natural disasters. The
main economic effect of the rule is expected to be on the beef and
cattle industry. For other species such as horses and other equine
species, poultry, sheep and goats, swine, and captive cervids, APHIS
would largely maintain and build on the identification requirements of
existing disease program regulations. Costs of an animal traceability
system would include those for tags and interstate certificates of
veterinary inspection (ICVIs) or other movement documentation, for
animals moved interstate. Incremental costs incurred are expected to
vary depending upon a number of factors, including whether an enterprise
does or does not already use eartags to identify individual cattle. For
many operators, costs of official animal identification and ICVIs would
be similar, respectively, to costs associated with current animal
identification practices and the in-shipment documentation currently
required by individual States. To the extent that official animal
identification and ICVIs would simply replace current requirements, the
incremental costs of the rule for private enterprises would be minimal.

Risks: This rulemaking is being undertaken to address the animal health
risks posed by gaps in the existing regulations concerning
identification of livestock being moved interstate. The current lack of
a comprehensive animal traceability program is impairing our ability to
trace animals that may be infected with disease.

Timetable:
Action Date FR Cite
NPRM 08/11/2011 76 FR 50082
NPRM Comment Period End 11/09/2011
Final Rule 08/00/2012

Additional Information: Additional information about APHIS and its
programs is available on the Internet at http://www.aphis.usda.gov.
Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: No Government Levels

Affected: State, Tribal
Small Entities Affected: Businesses Federalism: No
Included in the Regulatory Plan: Yes
RIN Data Printed in the FR: No

Agency Contact: Neil Hammerschmidt
Program Manager, Animal Disease Traceability, VS

Department of Agriculture
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
4700 River Road, Unit 46,
Riverdale, MD 20737-1231
Phone:301 734-5571
______________________________________________________________________

 

Editorial note: Although thousands of people have traveled the nation to express opposition and concerns about Animal ID enforcements, it appears none were heard by USDA and now a new round of talks are starting. One wonders what part of the USDA ID programs offered in the past the government did not understand or hear. Now it starts all over again with Animal Disease Traceability (ADT) sessions. The next one is in Denver as per the article below. Surely every rancher will drop his harvesting and fly to Denver to protect the family from intrusive and persistent new government enforcements. Perhaps like the infamous Listening Sessions of -09 each concerned livestock producer will be allowed a 3 minute rant session before the federal officials.
The attendance for one more meeting is encouraged for an “open flow of ideas” and to “develop sensible solutions.” Although everyone is invited by the United States Animal Health Assn and the National Institute for Animal Agriculture, co-hosts, the cost is hotel, travel and a full $250 each for enrollment if you are not a NIAA or USAHA member. If you want to join and be a member in good standing it is only $1000 for one year.
As over a thousand ranches bite the bullet and leave the business per month, costs of government enforcements and cheery little meetings increase. DD

Drovers

Talking traceability

Drovers news source
Tuesday, July 06, 2010

During February 2010, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that his agency would be redirecting its efforts surrounding animal identification in the nation to the development of a framework for animal disease traceability. The new framework places USDA in the role of determining rules for interstate movement of animals, and places the responsibility of traceability on States and Tribal Nations within their own boundaries. Given the details involved with this change in direction, there have been many questions raised by animal producers and marketers, as well as State and Tribal animal health officials.

Through a series of public meetings beginning in May, USDA has been gathering feedback on the new framework; however the public sessions have not provided the opportunity for all animal health officials and industry participants to meet jointly to discuss the many issues and develop sensible solutions for developing an animal disease traceability system that will best serve both groups.

As a result, it has been announced by the United States Animal Health Association (USAHA) and the National Institute for Animal Agriculture (NIAA) that they will co-host a Joint Strategy Forum on Animal Disease Traceability, to be held August 30-31, 2010 in Denver, Colorado. The Forum is being designed to facilitate much-needed interaction between State and Tribal animal health officials, animal producers, livestock marketers and handlers, and meat processors that yields valuable input on preliminary standards which are being developed by USDA’s Traceability Regulatory Working Group, expected to be released in mid-August.

“This Forum will allow for the open flow of ideas and concerns among those producing animals; State and Tribal officials responsible for protecting the health of animals in their areas; and USDA,” said Dr. Richard Breitmeyer, State Veterinarian for California and current president of USAHA. “Unless we have a discussion including all parties, the development of a viable animal disease traceability framework will be much more difficult.”

The Forum is open to everyone interested in the development of an effective and efficient system of identifying animals that move across State and Tribal lines in the U.S. Interactive sessions will be held covering all species of animals for which interstate movement requires compliance with animal health regulations.

“It has been announced by USDA that they intend to publish new rules on disease traceability by this winter, which makes this Forum crucial in conveying input before the rule is complete,” stated Dr. Michael Coe, co-chair of the Forum Planning Committee. “Given that timeline, industry and the States and Tribes need to make their positions known to decision-makers.”

The Joint Strategy Forum on Animal Disease Traceability will take place at the Renaissance Denver Hotel in Denver, Co. Hotel reservation and Forum registration information is available at www.animalagriculture.org or www.usaha.org.

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