Browsing Posts tagged nlis

ABA Chairman Brad Bellinger said today, “I am most concerned over recent trade data that shows that the USA without a National Livestock Identification Systems (NLIS) is gaining market share in both Japan and the EU compared to the beef exports for Australia.”

Mr Bellinger continued, “The volume of US beef being sent to Japan is up 40% in March 2011 compared to March 2010.  Although total imports for Japan increased for March imports from Australia actually fell by around 5% compared with the same period last year.”The devaluation of the US dollar against the yen and the rise in the Australian dollar is to blame for our poor performance in our most valuable export market.Economic reality not NLIS or extra marketing funds to Japan via an increased MLA levy  is what Ag Ministers and their advisors need to face.

Mr Bellinger said, “The European Market in which the NLIS promoters said we must have RFID tags shows a glaring example of its irrelevance.”

US beef shipments to the EU are forecast to reach 16,000 tones with Australia shipping roughly 3000 tonnes.

“State Governments have been gullible to believe that NLIS would increase market access when legislating the half billion dollar NLIS white elephant and we need an urgent Inquiry into NLIS using RFID tags”, Mr Bellinger declared.                                 ENDS

For more information please contact Brad Bellinger on 02 6725 4282 Mob 045 822 8989

John Carter 02 4832 1179 or Mob 0427 321 179

For more background information go to our website www.austbeef.com.au

Sally Black
Australian Beef Association
26 Desmond Lane
P O Box 446
OAKEY QLD 4401
Phone: 07 4691 2618
Fax:      07 4691 3814
Mobile:  041 1103 059
Email:     austbeef@netspace.net.au
Website: www.austbeef.com.au

Well, enforcement is always the next step with government regulation.  Here is an article from Australia:

Crackdown begins on saleyard compliance

12 Apr, 2011 09:14 AM

A STATEWIDE operation targeting sheep and goat sales is being launched this week to crackdown on identification and tracing compliance, NSW Department of Primary Industries (NSW DPI) Director Agricultural Compliance, Andrew Sanger said.

“Codenamed ‘Shepherd’, the crackdown is a joint operation between NSW DPI, the Livestock Health and Pest Authorities (LHPA) and the NSW Police Service’s Rural Crime Unit,” Mr Sanger said.

“The operation will specifically target landholder and industry compliance with the National Livestock Identification System (NLIS), Australia’s key scheme for identifying and tracing livestock.

“Over a six month period authorities will be visiting both large and small sheep and goat saleyards across the State to ensure landholders are meeting their requirements under the NLIS scheme.

“NLIS compliance is taken very seriously in NSW and penalties range from $550 fines through to prosecution for more serious offenders.”

Mr Sanger said Australia is recognised globally for producing clean, safe and quality meat products.

“NLIS helps us protect our enviable reputation and is a critical biosecurity measure in quickly and effectively responding to food safety and disease incidents,” Mr Sanger said.

“NLIS is also an important tool in tackling rural crime and the theft of stock.”

Under the NLIS scheme, all sheep must be ear tagged before they are moved from any property to a saleyard, abattoir or another property. The scheme uses visually readable ear tags printed with a Property Identification Code (PIC) to identify mobs of sheep and goats.

A man has been charged over the theft of $27,000 worth of cattle in northern NSW.

A man has been charged with stealing $27,000 worth of Angus cattle from a farm in northern NSW, removing their tags and then selling them on.

The 60-year-old allegedly stole the 27 head of cattle from a property in Gravesend in August this year.

The cattle, with an estimated value of $1000 a head, were taken from the property over two separate days, police allege.

The animal’s National Livestock Identification System (NLIS) tags were removed before they were all sold to a third party, who police said bought them in good faith.

The man from Warialda, in the state’s north, has been charged with stealing the cattle, removing approved identifiers from the stock and selling identifiable stock not identified.

The cattle have been recovered and will be returned to the owners, police said.

They are warning people to not buy stock without their NLIS identification tags attached and to contact police if they suspect stock theft.

The man is due to appear at Moree Local Court on January 24.

“So when you are told by the Meat and Livestock Association that our NLIS system is wonderful, or there is full traceability, they are not telling the truth.”

“We have alerted the Government to the situation but they argue the system is still being bedded down. In actual fact the percentage loss of traceability of Australian cattle herds is increasing over time.”


ABA has a beef with tags

Peter Weekes | 26th June 2010

MORE THAN a quarter of the cattle monitored by identification tags  are lost within the complex tracking system that costs $37 a head, a  summit heard yesterday.

At summit: At the Casino conference are Bill Bullard (left), CEO of R-Calf USA Ranches and Cattlemen Association, Australian Beef Association chairman Brad Bellinger, and ABA vice-chairwoman Linda Hewitt.

Doug Eton

MORE THAN a quarter of the cattle monitored by identification tags are lost within the complex tracking system that costs $37 a head, an Australian Beef Association summit heard yesterday.

The ABA’s chairman Brad Bellinger told a Casino meeting, which drew about 70 farmers from as far afield as Perth and Tasmania, the National Livestock Identification System that was foisted on cattle producers was ineffective and ‘potentially dangerous’.

The ABA recently commissioned an audit of 57,000 tags – the largest ever – to find out if the system allowed cattle to be traced back to the farm.

“The audit found 34.5 per cent did not have lifetime traceability,” Mr Bellinger said.

“So when you are told by the Meat and Livestock Association that our NLIS system is wonderful, or there is full traceability, they are not telling the truth.”

“We have alerted the Government to the situation but they argue the system is still being bedded down. In actual fact the percentage loss of traceability of Australian cattle herds is increasing over time.”

Mr Bellinger said the system’s failure was because of producer processes, not transferring cattle on the data base, tags failing out of the animals ears and being replaced by other and faulty reading equipment.

The National Livestock Identification System is Australia’s system for identification and traceability of live-stock. It was introduced in 1999 to meet European Union requirements for exports.

However, Mr Bellinger said the world’s largest beef exporter, Brazil, did not use any identification system.

He said the audit authors of Australia’s system found achieving lifetime traceability was unlikely to be ever achieved.

“To rely on NLIS for credible information to contain a highly contagious disease outbreak would be illusionary and potentially dangerous to the industry,” he said.

Mr Bellinger said the previous system of wrapping the animals’ tail around a tag and the accompanying paper trail was “more than adequate and a lot less costly”.

He also took aim at the industry’s body, the Meat and Livestock Association which has come under growing criticism since it supported the Federal Government’s recent attempts to allow imports of beef from mad-cow affected countries.

Only days before the nation’s boarders were to be opened, Federal Primary Industry Minister Tony Bourke did a back flip and, succumbing to cattle farmers’ demand for a full import risk analysis, effectively placed a two-year moratorium on lifting the import ban.

“After 13 years of an undemocratic meat industry structure, that has been shamelessly supported by both sides of politics, Australian cattle producers have had enough of trying to run enterprises with cattle prices unchanged in the last 20 years,” Mr Bellinger said.

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